Bookmarks for April 21st from 12:35 to 12:50

Social business pinboard links for April 21st, syndicated automagically:

  • Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Design Principles for Complex, Unpredictable, People Oriented Systems – I found the best explanation for the growing importance of design in a short, elegant article in The Economist, Design Takes Over, by Paola Antonelli, senior curator for architecture and design at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. “There are still people who believe that design is just about making things, people and places pretty.  In truth, design has spread like gas to almost all facets of human activity, from science and education to politics and policymaking.  For a simple reason: one of design’s most fundamental tasks is to help people deal with change.” “Designers stand between revolutions and everyday life.  When the internet happened, they created interfaces with buttons and hyperlinks that enabled us all to use it.  Designers make disruptive innovations manageable and approachable, so that they can be embraced and assimilated into life.  And they never forget functionality and elegance. . . Design is moving centre-stage in the eternal human quest to make beauty out of necessity.” Design principles are particularly applicable to problems that are socio-technical in nature, that is, they involve people and technology, having to deal both with complex technical, business and societal infrastructures and human behaviors.  They are critical for dealing with the Grand Challenge problems we are facing in the 21st century, including health care, urbanization, education, energy, finance, and job creation.   What do we mean by applying design principles to complex, unpredictable, people oriented systems and problems?  Let me discuss three such principles based on my personal experiences.
  • Innovating User Value – The Interrelations of Business Model Innovation, (Service) Design Thinking and the Production of Meaning | Service Design Network – Abstract
    We live in a hyper-competitive world, where whole industries either shift towards services or become obsolete due to new market entrants, technologies or even social practices. A world, where permanent interactions with customers, fast time-to-market, and the ability to innovate »right« (e.g. the right thing or value) are the key to corporate success. On that score the business sphere isn't getting tired of emphasising the need for strategic innovation (which means »creating superior customer value«, business model innovations or even the disruption and creation of new markets). This paper uncovers some of the often overlooked links of design (design thinking, design-driven innovation and service design) to strategic innovation through the lens of »customer value«. It will do so by …   Disenchanting the big corporate rhetoric on above claims by showing that prevailing and too one-sided understandings of strategy and innovation, rather reinforce than escape old industry paradigms.   Examining designs still undervalued contributions to strategy-making by approaching business challenges with a user/value-centric and radical service logic.   Showing that every dimension of strategic innovation culminates in the concept of perceived user value and meaning, which gets reviewed in detail (dimensions, forms, properties), especially with regards to constructing value propositions.   Arguing that the current service design and business model innovation discourses cannot be negotiated separately, as they may be good methodological complements.   So when speaking about the innovation of value for the customer, the paper argues, the above stated and seemingly separated fields intersect. Therefore their most apparent systemic connections and the facilitation of value creation by design are outlined and discussed.
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Bookmarks for April 15th from 10:08 to 20:11

Social business pinboard links for April 15th, syndicated automagically:

  • Open Innovation als strategisches Unternehmens-Konzept – Co-Creation/Toolkits für Open Innovation Je enger die Zusammenarbeit mit den externen Wissensträgern wird, desto wichtiger werden die Prozesse und Formen der Zusammenarbeit. Social Media- / Web2.0-Technologien sind die Basis für eine effiziente Zusammenarbeit. Unter Toolkits werden Entwicklungsumgebungen verstanden,  die es den Nutzer erlauben, ihre Bedürfnisse direkt und iterativ in den Produktmanagement-Prozess zu überführen. Spätestens in dieser Konstellation wird, wie generell im Social Media-Umfeld, eine offene Unternehmenskultur zur Voraussetzung für den Erfolg. Die nach innen gerichteten Denkweise des ‘Not Invented Here’ Syndroms würde die erfolgreiche Open Innovation-Strategie verhindern. Auch die Prozesse der Zusammenarbeit müssen geregelt werden, um die Effizienz, aber auch Motivation der Teilnehmer zu sichern. Co-Creation kann man häufiger in der Automobil-Industrie sehen. Beispiele sind Local Motors oder Streetscooter.
  • Managing beyond the organizational hierarchy with communities and social networks at Electronic Arts | opensource.com – Lessons EA’s experience also makes clear the need for management to support mass collaboration—management not in the sense of controlling but in the spirit of working within the community to help members refine their purpose as well as to motivate participation, generate a flow of ideas, and facilitate decisions should the community become deadlocked. Among the key lessons: Support and enable individuals, but don't add to their workload. Empower teams to make recommendations and decisions. Provide an interactive, content-filled platform that will draw people in and keep them interested and engaged Think big: what about communities of customers, partners, IT staff, and the entire business ecosystem? But start small: kick off 4-5 pilots to get started Establish governance and a competency center, but allow communities sufficient autonomy to spawn, scale and thrive The platform and toolset are critical success factors Get help and find leverage to jumpstart the platform. At a very minimum, communities should get people talking and sharing!
  • Reimagining capitalism—as principled, patient, and truly social | opensource.com – It’s time to radically revise the deeply-etched beliefs about what business is for, whose interests it serves, and how it creates value. We need a new form of capitalism for the 21st century—one dedicated to the promotion of greater well-being rather than the single-minded pursuit of growth and profits; one that doesn’t sacrifice the future for the near term; one with an appropriate regard for every stakeholder; and one that holds leaders accountable for all of the consequences of their actions. In other words, we need a capitalism that is profoundly principled, fundamentally patient, and socially accountable.
  • The Innovation Matrix Explained: Innovation Competence « Innovation Leadership Network – Elements of Innovation Competence As is the case with Innovation Commitment, we don’t have a system yet for quantifying Innovation Competence. While the core metric should be something like how many new ideas you execute and diffuse successfully, here are some questions you can ask to assess where you currently are along this dimension:

    How many new ideas do you successfully execute and diffuse?

    Are you good at all the components of the idea management process?

    Do you practice different forms of innovation?

    Do you practice both small and large innovation?

    Do you have an innovation portfolio

    Does your firm have a culture of systematic experimentation?

    Does your firm learn from failure?

  • A scenario is a description of a persona using a product to achieve a goal, they describe an instance of use…in context. (Contagious ideas by PSST : spreading 2.0 social innovation. Edited by jérémy dumont, strategic planner in FRANCE) – Why Use Them There are a number of reasons that scenarios are useful for experience design. They can provide a vehicle for communication as well as a mechanism to explore design solutions. They help mediate the thinking and communication required in design. They are concrete yet flexible enough to change and morph in detail as the project progresses. They help us understand the flow of experience and are tools for thinking about design (they help us reflect and reason) They help us present and situate solutions They help identify potential problems They are easily understandable by all stakeholders as they are story-like They can provide rich descriptions of use in context which can spark ideas and help inform design They help determine if the design solution is appropriate They can help us see social factors and help understand a users multi-channel experiences (i.e.z on and off-line_
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